back from the sabbat

I feel I should make this post, almost as a formality, though I did do a video on the same subject almost two weeks ago. You could call this my official Satanic coming out.

We celebrated Walpurgis Night with a simple ritual, involving a black candle and a chalice of red wine. We followed our usual, informal routine, similar to a Heathen blot, a mixture of offering, toasting, and requesting on this occasion, though we drank more than was poured down the sink at the end this time (when we use the drinking horn we usually use an offering bowl as well, and offer with each “round”). In my own offering and toasting I tried to speak as honestly as I could about my interest in Satanism. I didn’t do an affirmation or declaration of Satanism as such, because I didn’t need to make ritual gestures for something which should be about you and your life (ie it wouldn’t make any difference), but it was the first time I have referred to Satanism in one of our rituals. It was a good ritual for both of us, and we left the candle to burn down over night.

By the next day it was obvious that the ritual had really worked, and since then it’s become clear that I am in fact now a Satanist, and that has been a real source of joy for me. At last I have found the simple space, the plain way, the strong peace with myself. I’ve been finding some good fellowship and discussion with friends at The Temple of Theistic Satanism network site (open to Satanists and occultists of all kinds), and my own Devil’s Due group.

A lot of things are falling into place, and it’s like I walked out of an over complicated, imaginary building, into my own life.

That feels good.

L0025526 Histoires Prodigieuses: Effigie du faulx Imposteur...WMS 136 - by Pierre Boaistuau, a sixteenth-century French writer presented to Queen Elizabeth I in 1560.   The Wellcome Library holds this original copy of the beautifully illustrated manuscript that deals with all kinds of freakish happenings, including Siamese twins and other birth deformities, unexplainable diseases, extreme obesity and natural disasters. Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 - image cropped and electronically altered.

L0025526 Histoires Prodigieuses: Effigie du faulx Imposteur…WMS 136 – by Pierre Boaistuau, a sixteenth-century French writer presented to Queen Elizabeth I in 1560. 

The Wellcome Library holds this original copy of the beautifully illustrated manuscript that deals with all kinds of freakish happenings, including Siamese twins and other birth deformities, unexplainable diseases, extreme obesity and natural disasters. Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 – image cropped and electronically altered.

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